EX-KIAP NETWORK FORUM

an egalitarian discussion board for ex-kiaps, former colleagues such as didiman, chalkies, polis, ko-ops, dokta and whoever else wants to join in.
It is currently Mon Dec 11, 2017 7:35 pm

All times are UTC + 10 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2017 5:43 pm 
Offline
Ex-Kiap

Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2011 8:29 pm
Posts: 155
DOSS: 01 Jun 1971
This follows the fate of some Australian prisoners.The events narrated will imprint the conclusion the writer had wanted to epitomise,"it all depended on your Shoko".
Incidentally the fate of the British POws is mentioned.They were immediately subjected to hard labour and derision by the IJA.This for them commenced in February 1942,some of the Australian troops weren't sent to the railway until September 1942.Russell Braddon is quoted"Changi was a rest camp compared to the railway".
The personal stories surfacing for the last time revealed not all officers were equally meritorious.
Brune mentions as many informants by name but doesn't name the biggest criminals,suffice one informant says,"he never turned up to any reunions".
Blamey is further acknowledged as a great assett,compared to Bennett who he wanted to courts martial as a deserter.That the men have someone to fear and hate does not seem to detract from their effectiveness.Reg Newton is held up as an example of a man who could deflect the Japanese wrath onto himself saving his men.Dunlop force and whether Weary eclipsed others ,such as Corlette is not covered.....Albert Coates -


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2017 6:04 pm 
Offline
Ex-Kiap

Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2011 8:29 pm
Posts: 155
DOSS: 01 Jun 1971
Dr.Albert Coates is remembered as saying to another doctor who complained that a knowledge of dysentery and cholera was not going to put him in good stead in Australia,"you have learnt to know when a man is sick,something others have never learned,"
The Australian part in the Malay campaign is discussed emphasising their success at Gemas ,but acknowledging the bravery of the Argylls .26/12/1941-15/16-/2/1942.The action of a chaotic retreat without communications leads to the fate of many,not heard of or seen again.The first "self-evacuees"
reached Sumatra 29/12/1941,they were sent back to Singapore.So isolating the Australian experience gives only a small glimpse of a dark past,8500 Indians volunteered to be carriers to the Japanese and moved from Singapore to Rabaul to accompany Adachi in his fight back at Aitape.There is no mention of any war crimes trials relating to the prisoners treatment.Possibly there was some justice in the Hong Kong trials.Two Japanese continued to cut the grass at Lorengau High school til 1963,only the prisoners of Sugamo were left free.Ken Jervis was the old executioner who ran the Lorengau stockade.
The tragedy of the prisoners sunk on the way to Japan is mentioned,but not those who stayed at Changi
Did the Japanese ameliorate their treatment 1944/45,or did conditions worsen.
So many questions,it's as hard as finding out about Angau at Aitape.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 25, 2017 10:29 am 
Offline
Ex-Kiap

Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2007 5:40 pm
Posts: 216
Location: Mountain Creek, Queensland
DOSS: 28 Mar 1949
I am not sure whether this forum is the place to discuss the fate of Indian prisoners of the Japanese taken to PNG. However as Martin has raised the subject I was prompted to comment.
The Indian prisoners did not volunteer to be sent to PNG. They were taken to be used as slaves and most were moved from Rabaul to the mainland where they were systematically worked to death. Very few survived. During the Aitape-Wewak campaign where I served we recovered a few Indians being used as carriers for Japanese units and in some cases killed and eaten. When the war ended those few survivors were taken to Rabaul. Tragically and after recuperating and on the way home thirty were killed when the DC3 in which they were travelling crashed.
Little has been written about the six hundred or so British soldiers captured in Singapore who ended up in Kokopo and were treated so badly that many died there. The survivors were shipped to Bougainville and alleged killed by allied bombing when in fact they were murdered.
Re Martin's comment on Aitape. The book, The Third Force is the story of ANGAU and is worth reading. Inter alia it records the exploits of the Alan Gow, Bob Cole and David Fenbury (Fienberg) all of whom operated in the Aitape and all awarded the MC. It was an honour to have known them.
Des Martin ( now geriatric ex nineteen year old platoon Sgt.6 Aust Infantry Div'n)

_________________
service 1949-1966
Lae, Finschhafen,Dreikikir, Kokopo, Baniara, Esa'Ala, Ambunti, Dept .of the Administrator. Joined Commonwealth Service October 1966


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 25, 2017 8:39 pm 
Offline
Ex-Kiap
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 01, 2003 10:23 am
Posts: 94
Location: Tumby Bay South Australia
DOSS: 11 Sep 1967
Bloody hell Des! Your DOSS goes back to nine months after I was born. I'm nearly seventy. What do you put in your porridge in the morning?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2017 11:17 am 
Offline
Ex-Kiap

Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2007 5:40 pm
Posts: 216
Location: Mountain Creek, Queensland
DOSS: 28 Mar 1949
Phil,
Don't eat porridge; maybe that's the reason I am in my early 90's plus good genes and the odd stout and a couple if merlots in the evening. When I enlisted in the AIF I added a year to my real age being real keen knowing you had to be nineteen to be posted to a combat zone. When you signed up in WW2 they noted your age on enlistment as you gave it; not date of birth. When I faced Japs who started shooting at me I wished I had given my real age. Despite that I was made Sgt still at my supposed age. Like the Kiaps we were young and seeking adventure.

Des

_________________
service 1949-1966
Lae, Finschhafen,Dreikikir, Kokopo, Baniara, Esa'Ala, Ambunti, Dept .of the Administrator. Joined Commonwealth Service October 1966


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2017 7:35 pm 
Offline
Ex-Kiap

Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 3:31 pm
Posts: 223
Location: Blue Mountains
DOSS: 16 Jan 1954
Thanks for the hints Des. I am 7 years behind you also enjoy my 1 or 2 glasses of merlot each night. Hope I last a few more years. No more beers for me. George


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jul 28, 2017 11:29 am 
Offline
Ex-Kiap

Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2011 8:29 pm
Posts: 155
DOSS: 01 Jun 1971
Des,I am familiar with The Third Force.It has small vignettes of a wide geography.The photo of Dave Fienburg standing with the captured Japanese on the banks of the Sikau river of course rings with all
Patrol officers who were in the area.I will put an article up soon with some historic photos of the Nuku /
Lumi area reffering to these small coconut stands.They were planted in German times and occurred at Yapunda,Bairap and Telotei,possibly many more.Here the depositional nature of the river had large gravel deposits that were sluiced and boxed for gold.No villager would plant his crops in an open access position. If you walked from Dreikikir to Yapunda you would have entered here and cut to the Yapunda river.Our Nuku policeman KALAT had married a Womgrir lady and we diverted to his garden the first from the river.If the river was up you could walk through to the Yapunda and either cross it and walk to Seim or continue to a walking track up to the Makru ridge and then home to Nuku.
If you had slept at Yanungen you followed the Sikau down to this stand and helped yourself to the coconuts.White mans nuts.When the war finished people moved on quickly.I expected we would have had Kaads autobiography ,but no.Where are the ANGAU Aitape situation reports?The experiences of the ANGAU officers that landed with the Americans at Aitape are unrecorded?Was Yapunda still a base after
Cole moved to Maprik?Who stayed on at the finish at Aitape,what were ANGAU plans for future?


Last edited by Martin Kaalund on Thu Aug 24, 2017 7:39 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 30, 2017 7:49 pm 
Offline
Ex-Kiap
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 13, 2003 9:33 pm
Posts: 635
Location: Cardiff Wales
DOSS: 24 Aug 1970
Came across this article quite a few years ago. I think it’s worth reading.
"Remembering the war in New Guinea
Jemadar Chint Singh (People)
Module name: Groups (Indian perspective)
This page was contributed by Dr Peter Stanley (Australian War Memorial)

One of the recovered prisoners in the Wewak area was Jemadar Chint Singh of the 12th Frontier Force Regiment, formerly a member of 19 Indian Working Party, recovered at Auzoranu on the Sepik on 30 September 1945. Chint Singh's letter was photographed as Neg no. 101095. The official war artist R. Rowed also completed a drawing of him, ART25268 He had not only survived captivity, but was the only survivor of a plane-load of eighteen Indian prisoners who had been aboard a Dakota transport which crashed on take-off at Rabaul.

In January 1946 Chint Singh wrote a letter of appreciation for the treatment he had received at the hands of the 6th Division. Captain V.J.T. Sharpe of 2 Military History Field Team wrote to , attached HQ First Army, 6 February 1946 to Lieutenant Colonel J.L. Treloar, head of the Military History Section recommending that the letter be retained. Singh, he wrote had been 'a particular friend of everybody's at 6 Div and his gesture of farewell is I think something for the Aust[ralian] Forces to be proud of.'

Farewell to the Aust. 6th Division
Today the 13th Jan 1946, I find myself the luckiest man in the world, who worked here for 2 1/2 years as a P.O.W and for 3 months as a free man in the free world - which was full of terror and darkness when my contact ceased with it.

To the best of my knowledge 201 Indian Ps.O.W were rescued from time to time in the New Guinea Campaign by the 6th Aust Div, (later on 10 died in the plane crash, leaving only 191 the survivors out of 3000 - who were brought by the Japanese at Wewak on 16th May 1943) are greatly indebted to the Australian Forces. We were suffering from terrible diseases and there was no hope of life - at this hour of our calamity, the Division worked as Angels for us. We were fed, clothed and looked after in the hospitals and in camp by doctors, Nurses and the camp staff, to them we owe our lives. Every member of the Div shared with our miseries and helped us, pleased us in this wilderness, where we had no hope to live.

Today I feel very happy that the Almighty Father has fulfilled my ambitions - i. To take the right retribution with those who are responsible for the death of 2800 Indians. Ii, To tell the world about the fate of 3000 Indians who went under so many privations and lost their lives. (iii) To see Australia where I am flying today. But I feel sorry at the recollection of my comrades who had the same ambitions and we together used to make schemes for the visit to Australia. The bad luck did not favour and only a few got this opportunity.

The sympathy, love and affection shown by the every individual of the Div will always be with us and we and our countrymen will be very proud of it.With all the best wishes for the many years to come and hoping that the friendship of your country and India will continue for all the time.
Jem. Chint Singh 1

Notes
1. 13/1/46 AWM 54, 779/1/20, 'Letter from Jemedar [sic] Chint Singh (Indian Officer, ex P.O.W. of Japanese at Wewak) to 6th Australian Division.' "

Watched BBC news item this week re new movie - 'Dunkirk' and heard how there were Indians even there too. The as yet unpartitioned India saw 87000 deaths in WW2 out of their over two millions under arms.
Without the all old Empire forces goodness knows how Britain would have fared in WW1 and WW2
Fraternally
arthur


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 

All times are UTC + 10 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group