EX-KIAP NETWORK FORUM

an egalitarian discussion board for ex-kiaps, former colleagues such as didiman, chalkies, polis, ko-ops, dokta and whoever else wants to join in.
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2018 5:36 pm 
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Location: Skye, SA
DOSS: 03 Dec 1965
I like to think the luck that my daughters have is having me for a dad, although I'm pretty sure they'd disagree :roll:
Anyway the SsangYong are a second car, used for ferrying parents and luggage to airports etc., so they don't get overworked; the nearest they get to adventure is backing a boat-trailer down the ramp.
Tumby is a pretty place but my preference for a quiet seaside town would be Esperance. Lots of granite islands, fabulous unspoilt beaches and adjacent to a huge National Park which almost guarantees it'll remain pristine, and it's far enough from civilization not to experience gross "development".
I'm guessing you're a book tragic like me. Something which may interest you
https://www.auctionblue.com.au/AuctionD ... n=1&pgs=10
Description:
under instruction from Australian Executor Trustees in the Estate of G Jackman.
The library of Harold Jackman including very rare and important books on and Journals on Papua New Guinea and other subjects.

There seems to be some pretty good stuff amongst dross; can't be too many specialised NG collectors around - hopefully the complete shelves will go for not much.

The library is at Angaston but I'm not sure if the auction is in Adelaide or Angaston.
Ring & find out.

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 Post subject: Re: TEMP - PETER SALMON
PostPosted: Sun Jul 29, 2018 8:51 am 
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Location: Tumby Bay South Australia
DOSS: 11 Sep 1967
Thanks Iain.

Harry lived in Angaston so that would be a logical place for the auction. The town hall & library are in Washington Street.

Esperance sounds nice. Maybe when we've worn out our welcome in Tumby. Go west old man!

I've got a fairly large PNG collection and I've often wondered what to do with them all when I cark it. I don't think my kids would be interested, although my son has spent time up there. Ideally I'd like them to go to PNG, maybe to the Simbu Writer's Association, but I've got a fair idea what might happen to them and getting them up there would not only be expensive but pretty hit and miss.

Our move from Hervey Bay was the inevitable downsizing exercise. I had a lot of non-PNG books and I traipsed all over the place looking for someone who might want them. They were on offer for free but not even the schools were interested; the op shops even threw their hands up in the air. A sad reflection on the times I think.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 29, 2018 4:35 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 3:31 pm
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Location: Blue Mountains
DOSS: 16 Jan 1954
I find Iain Miller's and Phil Fitzpatrick's comments very interesting. Harry Jackman died in 2006 and it is the estate of his wife, Grace, which is selling the books. Most of the books will be pre 2000. Grace Jackman was previously Grace Cuthbertson and worked for the Dept. of Native Affairs. (I transferred from Native Affairs to Dept. of Business Development in May, 1964, as a Business Adviser and finished up in 1975 as the Senior Financial Adviser of the Dept. - I had then got my B.Comm. from University of Queensland completely by correspondence and my accountancy qualifications. Harry Jackman was in charge of Co-ops and the Business Advisory Service.) I am sure there are valuable books being sold. I have been spending a lot of time on Facebook forum "NGI Historical Society"" which was started by Gideon Kakabin who is at present working at the Australian War Museum as an artist for 1 month. He is visiting us here at Woodford NSW at the end of August. There are many people in PNG who are hungry for books on their early history. I have recently mentioned two books on this Facebook forum (just about every province has several Facebook forums started on it.) One of the books I mentioned was "In Wild New Britain" the story of Ben Danks who was in New Britain from 1878. I have a copy of this. I looked up Abebooks and found just 1 copy available for A$134.06 with postage of US$33 to Australia.It is also now available through Kindle for $5.86 by wireless delivery (the copyright has expired). I suggest that ex-kiaps look up the Facebook forums especially where they have been and I am certain you will find them interesting. PNG has always remained special to me. I was born near Rabaul in January, 1934 and was evacuated with my mother and brother in September, 1941 to Sydney. (My father was lost on the Montevideo Maru.) I returned to PNG in January, 1954, as a liklik kiap. Peter, perhaps this subject of books should have its own heading? I do not trust sending books by mail to PNG. Last December I sent a book to Gideon and it cost me $33 postage and it disappeared! We have just printed a book "Journey to Nakanai, New Britain, 1932 - 1935" and sent a lot of books, which were collected in Sydney up to Nakanai. My wife Edna's parents were at Malalia, Nakanai as Methodist missionaries and Edna was born there, twins with her sister, Nancy. Luckily, there were no complications but they were premature. We do not have any copies of the book left. In August, next month, Nakanai Methodist Church is celebrating their centenary - that is why we wrote the book. I am at present working on my story especially the 10.5 years as a kiap, and nearly 30 years in PNG.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 29, 2018 7:29 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 3:31 pm
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Location: Blue Mountains
DOSS: 16 Jan 1954
Thanks Phil for your comments. I knew Harry as a collector of books. You say that Harry was a "prolific writer in his later years." I did not know this. Could you give me the name of some of his work please? After 1975, I was not that close to him.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2018 10:21 am 
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Location: Tumby Bay South Australia
DOSS: 11 Sep 1967
I can't put my finger exactly on his publications George but I've come across them in various academic journals when I've been researching areas for social mapping. Most of what he wrote was pretty heavy duty stuff to do with agricultural economics. I do recall a couple of articles that were published in Quadrant, which makes sense because he was a friend of Peter Ryan. Here is his obituary from 'Una Voce'.

Harry Hans JACKMAN, MBE (8 March 2006, aged 84)

Few careers have been so versatile or varied as Harry’s. Rescued as a boy from Nazi Germany, he was adopted in Melbourne by the Nathan family. His education ranged from Alf Conlon’s School of Pacific Administration in Sydney to Victoria’s Dookie Agricultural College. He served in the Second AIF (mainly in ANGAU) from 1942 to 1946 and then joined the civil administration as a Patrol Officer, eventually becoming Registrar of Cooperatives, holding this position until his retirement. His sterling service to the post-World War II PNG administration was directed mostly to the training and development of the rising generation of Papua New Guineans who would soon be running their own government. Harry greatly prized the MBE awarded to him in 1978 at the recommendation of the PNG government.

Harry was a natural scholar and had numerous academic qualifications. After retiring from PNG, he held academic teaching posts in Australia. He was an active member of many learned bodies, and a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society (London). His great pleasure was to review books, especially about the Pacific, always judiciously and fairly, informed by his great personal experience and wide reading. His distinguished and immaculately presented library was his great and justifiable pride. Among his own publications there is a highly interesting study – Malaria in German New Guinea (1990).

Harry was never reluctant to enter public controversy whenever he could shed light on the affairs of his beloved PNG. His widow, Grace, whose constant care and tenderness comforted Harry in his last painful illness, still resides in Angaston. He is survived also by his daughter Bronwen who has five sons, and by his son Max.
Peter Ryan

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2018 10:44 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 3:31 pm
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Location: Blue Mountains
DOSS: 16 Jan 1954
Thank you Phil. I had not realised he wrote an article on Malaria in German New Guinea. I note a mistake in his obituary in Una Voce. In about 1967 he became Chief of Division over Co-ops and the Business Advisory Service. 'Speed' Graham became Registrar of Co-ops. until near Independence. I must have read the Una Voce at the time of his obituary but cannot remember. Keep up your good work Phil.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2018 3:43 pm 
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Location: Skye, SA
DOSS: 03 Dec 1965
I have several thousand books on various subjects including many books on NG.
Don't know what to do with them as my children are functionally illiterate and the charity shops don't want them.
Have picked up many interesting books from charity shops for little, signed first editions etc.; they don't know what they are and don't care much.
Noticed one of the Jackman lots is a second edition of D'Albertis "What I did and what I saw" considering a first edition is the best part of A$3,500 maybe my wife will forbid me from bidding.
Not many people know he was accompanied by the famous Australian aeronautical genius Lawrence Hargrave who was making his 4th trip to NG. Hargrave featured on the A$20 note until 1994 when he was usurped by John Flynn.
As far as books in NG are concerned I think it is a waste unless they are E-books. I had a pair of suede shoes which went green with mould after a week in a wardrobe in Lae and I saw priceless books in the cathedral in Dogura rotten with damp and mould - they need to be kept in air-conditioned storage - South Australia is the only place to keep books. As I understand it the museum in POM has been stripped of donated artifacts so nothing's very safe from thieves.
Anyway, some time ago I saw allegedly authentic original patrol reports for sale. Someone had raided the SDO's in various historic outstations and stolen the reports. Wish I'd thought of it. :twisted: :twisted: :twisted:

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"What is man, when you come to think upon him, but a minutely set, ingenious machine for turning, with infinite artfulness, the red wine of Shiraz into urine?"


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2018 5:35 pm 
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There is a certain irony with us in Australia wondering what to do with our books that nobody seems to want and the situation outside the main centres in PNG where the Internet has yet to tread and people are craving hard copy books. There are hundreds, maybe thousands of schools that would love to have our books. I recall about 2014 going to a school on Manus that had a beautiful library built as payoff as part of Howard's Pacific Solution Mark 1. There were seven books in that library. And that is one of the most highly literate societies in PNG.

Keith Jackson and I discovered that when we set up the Crocodile Prize for Literature and produced annual anthologies we had to do it in hard copy rather than as ebooks because where we wanted them to go had no access to the Internet.

We in Australia, together with Mosbi and Lae, are in 2018 but beyond the towns in PNG it is 1950 and regressing quickly towards the 1890s.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2018 8:40 pm 
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Location: Swan Hill, Victoria, 3585
My wife and I have sent many boxes of general interest and childrens books from our local municipal library here at Swan Hill, Vic, to a school in Rabaul. Admittedly some have been stolen between the Rabaul wharf and the school, but does it really matter if they end up for sale at Koki or the Rabaul bung? At least someone is getting to read them!

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2018 8:06 am 
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That was our final conclusion John - at least people were reading them.

It just peeved us a bit that the thieves were making money out of it.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2018 9:17 am 
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Location: Swan Hill, Victoria, 3585
I well know the feeling!. But I also know the feeling from seeing teachers and students receiving the books. It never ceases to amaze me in my PNG travels that that even in the remotest location, there is often a dedicated teacher and/or health worker (usually a female nurse with a white uniform) labouring on with practically no resources.
What really hurts is seeing stolen government medical supplies destined for Health Centre or Aid Post use, being sold in the streets of urban centres. Not only does this deny rural people access to medication, it also results in the criminal misuse of antibiotics and other drugs, resulting in a myriad of complications including antibiotic resistance which ultimately affects all of us.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2018 9:36 am 
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Location: Brisbane, Australia
DOSS: 08 Nov 1965
Give me a day or so but I'm going to move this issue of "our" to a new topic as this, I think is an important issue, more to be said later.

Peter.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2018 10:20 am 
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This is an article I wrote for PNG Attitude in 2014.

02 December 2014

A thoroughly callous crime: The book thieves of PNG

PHIL FITZPATRICK

THERE are unexpected drawbacks in running something like the Crocodile Prize national literary award in Papua New Guinea.

Like some sponsors, who make all sorts of promises and lead you up the garden path and wait until you’ve made irrevocable commitments before pulling the rug out from under you.

Or people who promise faithfully to do certain things and then blithely ignore them.

Then there are things that are a bit more inexplicable.

A case in point is the delivery of copies of the anthology and some of the other books that have spun out of the competition.

As a publisher, Pukpuk Publishing has duly despatched copies of its books to the National Library in Port Moresby. This is a statutory requirement but is mostly ignored by publishers in Papua New Guinea and Australia.

The books have been sent by post and were addressed to the Chief Librarian by name. None of them arrived.

I remedied this in September, when I carried copies of the books and personally presented them to the library. We discussed the matter but couldn’t explain it.

For the 2014 anthology we’ve been getting copies of the book sent directly from the USA to various recipients for distribution. Quite a few shipments have gone astray, enough to be a worry.

In tracking these shipments we’ve discovered that they all make it to Papua New Guinea before disappearing.

The printer Createspace uses a variety of freight companies, depending upon the size of the order. The shipments usually go to agents in Port Moresby before being delivered. Small shipments go by ordinary mail.

Some of the agents collect GST and customs duties, others don’t; it’s quite unpredictable and mysterious.

Some of the lost books are traceable. A recent shipment of six copies of Diddie Kinamun Jackson’s poetry collection, Daddy Two Shoes, addressed to her seems to have been sent to Indonesia by one of Createspace’s shippers.

Obviously someone in the USA thinks that Papua New Guinea is part of Indonesia.

That’s simple stupidity, but there are some other patterns emerging with more sinister connotations.

I have got some contacts in Mosbi who have been checking shipments for me and what they report isn’t good.

About two weeks ago, one of them reported seeing copies of the anthology on sale in one of Mosbi’s markets. The seller also had copies of books obviously stolen from the National Library and school libraries.

The seller wouldn’t say where he had got them. He did know, however, that they are a very marketable commodity. It’s not quite on a par with stealing and selling medicines from the hospitals but it’s still annoying.

The market is fairly close to where a few shipments have gone missing, the Boroko Post Office.

Oddly enough, the copies of the books addressed to the National Library were all sent to a Boroko Post Office box number.

Another interesting aspect is that shipments to Buka rank highly in the missing and lost category.

I haven’t said anything to date but I’m starting to suspect that some of the shipments have been stolen.

This is particularly aggravating because we distribute the anthology free of charge. The other Pukpuk books are sold at cost to keep the prices as low as possible.

I suppose, in a perverse sort of way, it’s encouraging to think that the books are still going to people who want to read them.

What irks us is the possibility that thieves are making money out of our efforts.

Unfortunately we can’t really do much about it. If Inspector Metau was real he might be able to help.

Createspace is really good because, at no cost, it will replace shipments that have gone missing and will despatch replacements by expensive priority freight.

Sooner or later, however, Createspace will tire of Papua New Guinea.

One of the other big print-on-demand companies, Lightning Source, a USA company with a handy branch in Melbourne, won’t ship directly to PNG. They are too polite to say why, but I think I know the reason.

We’ll keep shipping the books in the hope that most of them will get through. There’s not much else we can do beyond quitting in frustration.

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The merger of corporate and state interests and worship of the Friedman doctrine in an era of rampant unfettered casino capitalism with laissez faire ideology ensures profit is privatised and the loss is socialised.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2018 9:35 pm 
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Just a thought, considering the number of cruise ships that now go to Alotau maybe you could persuade a couple of passengers to take books and get the headmaster??? of Cameron High School to meet the ship and send the books to their destinations.

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